The Journal for Interdisciplinary Middle Eastern Studies

The Coptic Christian Minority in Contemporary Egypt since the Arab Spring

The Coptic Christian Minority in Contemporary Egypt since the Arab Spring

  • Max Guirguis

Abstract

Despite their participation as citizens and patriots in the Egyptian Revolution of 2011, Coptic Christians were subjected to mob violence and other hostile acts after Mubarak’s fall. Their situation further deteriorated under the short-lived presidency of Mohammad Morsi and during the chaotic period that followed his ouster by the military in July 2013. The continuation of sectarian hatred, discriminatory behavior, and anti-Christian violence under the current President, Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi, demonstrates that he has not taken sufficient action to confront violent Islamism and promote tolerance toward the country’s Christian minority. More needs to be done to protect non-Muslims from terrorism and extremism. Yet Sisi, like his predecessors, continues to avoid the “Coptic question” in the name of national unity, notwithstanding his more positive disposition and conciliatory rhetoric toward Christians.

Keywords

  • Egypt
  • Coptic Christians
  • Muslim Brotherhood
  • Terrorism
  • Revolution
  • Morsi
  • Sisi

To cite this article: Max Guirguis, “The Coptic Christian Minority in Contemporary Egypt since the Arab Spring”, The Journal for Interdisciplinary Middle Eastern Studies, 3 (2018), pp. 37-71.

ISSN (Print): 2522-347X
ISSN (Online): 2522-6959

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