The Journal for Interdisciplinary Middle Eastern Studies

The Likelihood of a Durable Peace and Longstanding Stability in an Integrated Iraq in the Aftermath of the Military Defeat of the Islamic State (IS) Group

The Likelihood of a Durable Peace and Longstanding Stability in an Integrated Iraq in the Aftermath of the Military Defeat of the Islamic State (IS) Group

  • Kardo Rached
  • Wrya Hiwa Ali

Abstract

Since its establishment the modern state of Iraq has witnessed instabilities, insurgencies, and continuous cyclic and violent conflicts among its heterogeneous components. The emergence of the IS group in Iraq has been the latest and, at the same time, one of the darkest episodes in modern Iraq’s turbulent history. This bloody and horrible wave of violence, which is characteristic of such terrorist organizations that commit all kinds of brutality against humanity, has forced both ordinary Iraqi people from all parts of its heterogeneous opulations, together with experts, to question whether peaceful co-existence, stability, and the continuation of living together within the border of an integrated Iraq is possible. Unlike most expert assessments that tend to deal with each of Iraq’s violent waves separately and develop particular prescriptions for each of them, this article argues that the continuous, persistent and intractable conflicts are just symptoms and that the cause of modern Iraq’s problems have come from the misperception and miscalculations generated by both the exogenous state-builders, Great Britain and the USA, during their efforts at state-building in Iraq in the 1920s and in 2003 respectively. In the process of these efforts at state building the promotion of non-ethnic solutions (assimilation, and integration) and even ideal ethnic solutions like federation were tried without achieving any tangible progress towards durable and long-standing stability in Iraq. Keeping in mind the fact that primordial ethno-sectarian affiliations are beyond transformation, the study endorses the “soft partition plan” presented as the latest proposal for a new state building process in Iraq which has been supported by some scholars and important international political figures that have left their fingerprints on the global level.

Keywords

  • Integrated Iraq
  • Heterogeneous components
  • Exogenous statebuilders
  • State-building failure
  • Primordial ethno-sectarian affiliations
  • Soft partition plan

To cite this article: Kardo Rached and Wrya Hiwa Ali, “The Likelihood of a Durable Peace and Longstanding Stability in an Integrated Iraq in the Aftermath of the Military Defeat of the Islamic State (IS) Group”, The Journal for Interdisciplinary Middle Eastern Studies, 3 (2018), pp. 73-93

ISSN (Print): 2522-347X
ISSN (Online): 2522-6959

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